Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 3rd Annual Congress & Medicare Expo on Primary Healthcare, Clinical & Medical Case Reports Dubai, UAE.

Day 3 :

  • Primary Home Care
    Primary Care: Fitness and Wellness
    Primary Care Nurse Practitioner
    Primary Care Epidemiology

Session Introduction

Pankaj Gupta

Taurus Glocal Consulting, India

Title: Role of meta data and data standards in primary and public healthcare

Time : 09:00-09:20

Speaker
Biography:

Pankaj Gupta come with a rich combination of medical background, IT experience and specialization in General Management from Indian Institute of Management Bangalore. For over 2 decades I have been working in Healthcare/Pharma Technology business and Healthcare/Pharma process standardization. I started with running my primary care clinics for 8 years before getting into Healthcare IT and Management roles globally. I came back full circle to lead the total IT and process transformation of Max Healthcare Group of Hospitals. My global experience includes starting and leading Business Units @ US/ Global Corporations e.g. Cerner, FCG/CSC, Perot/Dell, Infosys. I have managed IT and Quality Departments of US Hospitals and delivered business transformation by process standardization. Also worked in Bioinformatics, Large Pharma IT, Clinical Trials IT. I was instrumental in writing the Meta Data and Data eHealth Standards for MoHFW Govt of India.

Abstract:

The Public Health System in India is struggling with multiplicity of information systems being used at central as well as at state level. Each of these systems is unable to exchange data and information with each other. To overcome similar challenges across ministries, the Ministry of Communication and Technologies initiated semantic standardization across various domains under Metadata and Data Standards (MDDS) project. The intent was to promote the growth of e-Governance within the country by establishing interoperability across e-Governance applications for seamless sharing of data and services. MDDS for Health domain was created by adopting global standards in such a way that existing applications could be easily upgraded to the MDDS standards. The exercise yielded approximately 1000 data elements. These data elements were expected to serve as the common minimum data elements for development of IT applications for various sub domains of health care.

The Need:The need for the CDE arose because most of the primary and public health IT applications are being developed without any standards by different agencies and vendors in public and private sector in India. Each application is developed for standalone use without much attention to semantic interoperability. Later when the thought of interoperability emerges – it becomes difficult to connect the primary and public health systems and make them talk to each other because they were never designed for that purpose. Even if technical and organizational interoperability is done the semantic interoperability may remain a challenge.  For example – all primary and public health applications must have the same Facility Master. When Application A sends the ANC data for Facility 123, the receiving Application B should understand ANC and uniquely identify Facility 123. Another example is if a hospital application sends the insurance reimbursement bill to insurance company/government, the recipient application should be able to understand and represent the same meaning of bill information.

Pilot Test:Ministry of Health & Family Welfare has initiated development of the national health facility registry. The registry was intended to standardize facility masters used across public health information systems. Standardization of facility masters is required for two purposes, first when exchanging data the sending and receiving applications should be able to identify health facility similarly. For example – when Application A sends the maternal health data for Facility 123, the receiving Application B should understand maternal health data and uniquely identify Facility 123.

Second, in public health, performance of each of the facility is assessed using aggregate indicators and facility master serve as the secondary data source on which primary program specific data is aggregated. For example- data from number of doctors from system A and total outpatient attendance data from system B could be analyzed to get per doctor patient load across health facilities only when both applications use common facility masters.

Speaker
Biography:

Anshul Govila is a trained General Surgeon with a membership to the Royal College of Surgeons, Edinburgh and an MBA from London Business School. As passionate as he is about evidence based surgical practices, he is equally passionate about establishing healthcare practices which improve access, accountability and quality of care. To that purpose in his current role as Deputy COO of Universal Hospitals, he has been fundamentally involved in the growth of the network with the relevant accreditation.

Abstract:

Primary Care Physicians have always been the funnel through which all patients reach to the tertiary care facilities. This is a more so established dictum in old established healthcare networks like the NHS, the US, continental Europe, Canada and Australia. This model has always seen that strong trained General Practioners cognizably take care of a patient population of 1500-2000. In the process they not only deal with emergent conditions the patients go through but run several risk assessment clinics and several outreach programs for disease prevention. In the geographies mentioned above Practioners are incentivized through schemes to prevent smoking, ask patients to loose weight, maintain compliance to medications and so much so that they are involved in the social wellbeing of the family. The primary care network in the UAE is also being shaped on similar lines but a majority of the expat population cannot avail of this. This population has its own peculiarities, it is underinsured, migratory and is more or less demographically in the middle age bracket with children. Traditionally it has not had any geriatric patients or severely medically compromised patients in its mix. Creating facilities which will cater to this population in an evidence based manner has always been a challenge. To incorporate this in to the bigger plan of a growing hospital is another challenge. The challenges primarily are deployment of human resource, keeping the physicians engaged and seeing that they are not incentivized to over prescribe or over investigate. The model suggested in the presentation is a model we follow to get accountable care and will be detailed in the presentation.

Mustafa Afifi

Ras al-Khaimah Medical and Health Sciences University, UAE

Title: Violence against woman via a primary care lens

Time : 09:40-10:00

Speaker
Biography:

Mustafa Afifi held his Medical Bachelor, Master of Internal Medicine and three Post-graduate Diplomas in Mental Health, Primary Health Care and General Administration. Then he terminated his Doctorate in Public Health followed by another Master’s in Health Professional Education. He had his Postdoctoral training in the American University Beirut. He worked in many countries, of them is the UAE. In the UAE, he worked as a Consultant of Mental Health for the Ministry of Health (Head Quarter) for six years, where he integrated mental health services in Primary Health Care. Then, he got his post as Assistant Professor in RAK Medical & Health Sciences University. He has over 80 PubMed publications in non-communicable diseases, mental health, gender issues and health professional education. He is also a Member of many Editorials or Referee Boards of many PubMed indexed medical journals.

Abstract:

Primary Health Care (PHC) settings are unique in its nature because it deals with an entire family across the life span. Our aim in this study was to help the PHC doctors to identify and respond to cases of Violence Against Women (VAW) all over her life cycle. A PubMed based mini review was conducted based on papers published the last 20 years. We found that VAW usually starts even before the girl is born. Gender preference for males affect the survival, nutritional status of daughters, their physical development and differential access to education and health facilities. Then, in her early years of childhood, female genital cutting (FGC) is practiced in Africa and Asia. Its long-term complications include pain and scarring. Some of the adult women experienced the negative reproductive health effects. Being an adolescent, the girl could be exposed to forced marriage. Then, they may be subject to repeated domestic violence from their partner. In both forced and normal marriage arrangements, women could be prone to domestic violence. Suicide and self-harm could follow domestic violence. Moreover, during marriage, polygamy is another moral threat to wives and is associated with poor women mental health regardless of their socioeconomic position and education. Even after aging, women could be subjected to elderly abuse. The PHC doctor should be oriented about the 9 steps of VAW intervention (R9). He should know his role with victimized patients and express his readiness to listen to them and manage them. Doctors should be trained to recognize symptoms of violence, keeping in their mind its risk factors. Usually, the patient needs to be reviewed several times, even after her first visit or even after being referred to higher levels of care. Doctors should be reflective in their management with a respecting attitude to their patients.

Silverio Di Rocca

MPR International School, Switzerland

Title: Myofunctional and postural rehabilitation

Time : 10:00-10:30

Speaker
Biography:

Silverio Di Rocca completed his Graduation in Dentistry and Post-graduation in Functional Orthopaedics from University of Buenos Aires, Argentina. He has also done a degree in Dentistry and Prosthetic at the University of Turin, Italy and a Doctorate in Dentistry and Prosthetic at University of Turin, Italy. He is the Director of the MPR International School, Vice President International representative and Founder of API Swiss (International Association of Posturology Switzerland). He is also a Professor in Amocoac Diplomate in Mexico and COMEI, College of Dentistry in Mexico, Associate Professor in ICOM (International College of Osteopathic Medicine) Milan, Italy and an International Honorary member of AMOCOAC.

Abstract:

Miofunctional Postural Rehabilitation is a method that seeks balance between stomatognatic system and the rest of the body which can be used at any age in the dysfunctional patients. In physiotherapy, usually we have relapses in our treatments and we are not aware of patients with chronic pain who are visited for several specialists without results. After that journey they are considered as psychiatric patients and the specialist is disappointed because they do not have a holistic optic in their therapies which is a major cause for the negative action of the stomatognathic system on the static posture altering the function of other receptors like eye and foot. Dysfunction treatment should be carried which identifies the origin of the disease and therapeutic priority. The MPR will teach you to identify it and treat the disease with natural and physiological treatments.

Speaker
Biography:

Norma Ponzoni is a Faculty Lecturer at the McGill Ingram School of Nursing, Quebec, Canada. She is the Academic Coordinator for the Nurse Practitioner Programs. She has graduate degrees in Nursing and Education and is completing her PhD in Educational Psychology at McGill. She has several publications in peer-reviewed journals and is nationally and internationally well-known in the area of nursing education and advanced practice. Her research is focused on primary care and the process by which it can be facilitated and the delivery of professional development to rural regions that make this care possible to isolated populations.

Abstract:

Legislation supporting Nurse Practitioner (NP) practice has allowed the role to expand in Canada; however the introduction of this new role to health care teams has not always gone smoothly. Since NPs provide direct care to patients and have an expanded clinical role, the literature has indicated that the overlapping nature of their scopes of practice with Clinical Nurse Specialists (CNSs) are often a source of tension and that at times, they work in competition. On the other hand these two roles are complementary and collaboration between them can provide improved patient-centered primary care services. A focus group was conducted to explore the relationship between these advance practice nurses, working in two community health centers in Quebec, for the purpose of exploring the facilitators and barriers to their intra-professional collaboration. After content analysis, the data from these nurses, 2 NPs and 4 CNSs, indicated that after an initial period of confusion due to a lack of understanding of roles and overlapping scopes, the advanced preparation of the NPs and their constant presence within the team was a strong and comfortable source of support to CNSs’ practice. Since the majority of community care in Quebec is offered by CNSs, it is logical to assume that better support from their colleagues would have a direct impact on the primary care services they provide.

Speaker
Biography:

Nadira Abbas Albaghli is a consultant in family & community medicine graduated from King Faisal University, KSA, and having master degree in professions medical education from Arabian Gulf University, Bahrain. She was Director of infection control in Eastern Province, KSA for 5 years. Currently working in consultation clinics in Dammam, Directorate of Health Affairs, EP, KSA, She has published more than 15 papers in reputed journals about chronic diseases and medical education programs. Have Special interests in biostatistics, EBM, and infection control.

Abstract:

Objective: To assess the pattern of follow-up and level of hypertension control according to sociodemographic, and clinical risk factors in the participants of a screening campaign.

Research Design & Methods: In 2004, all Saudi residents in the Eastern Province, aged 30 years and above, were invited to participate in a screening campaign for the early detection of diabetes and hypertension. A structured questionnaire was completed during a face-to-face interview. The presence of hypertension and the place of follow-up were recorded. Blood pressure was measured by trained nurses using a mercury sphygmomanometer, according to the recommendations of The Seventh Report of the Joint National Committee on Prevention, Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Pressure (JNC VII).

Results: Thirteen point one percent of the participants had been previously diagnosed as having hypertension. In 34.3% of them, blood pressure was controlled, while 40.8% had combined uncontrolled SBP and DBP, 14.4% had isolated uncontrolled SBP, and 10.5% had isolated uncontrolled DBP. The blood pressure control was inversely associated with age. It was higher in women, singles, the educated, in those with BMI of less than 25 kg/m2, and in those with positive history of CVD (p<0.001).

Conclusion: Co-morbidities relevant for hypertension are very prevalent, so aggressive BP control is mandatory.

Break: Networking & Refreshments Break: 11:10-11:30
Speaker
Biography:

Tayebeh Ilaghi has completed her PhD and is an expert in qualitative and quantitative research in adults and paediatric and neonatal nursing. Currently, she is a Faculty in Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Iran.

Abstract:

Type II diabetes is one of the most prevalent chronic diseases that reduce happiness. Group hope therapy can be used to increase happiness of such patients. The present research aims to determine effectiveness of group hope therapy on happiness of patients with type II diabetes who referred to a diabetic clinic at southeast of Iran. This is a quasi-experimental study. Statistical population is all patients with type II diabetes who referred to a diabetic clinic at southeast of Iran. Among them, 40 individuals were selected based on inclusion criteria and they were placed in intervention and control groups using random numbers’ table. Intervention group received group hope therapy within 8 sessions. Oxford happiness questionnaire was used. Data were analysed using descriptive and inferential statistics such as independent t and paired t tests. Happiness was significantly increased in intervention group after group hope therapy (P<0.001). Moreover, mean happiness in control group was increased after group hope therapy but it was not significant (P=0.22). Results showed that group hope therapy improved happiness of diabetic patients and it can be used by healthcare team.

Khaldoun Hamdan

Al-Ahliyya Amman University, Jordan

Title: Perceived Benefits and Barriers to Exercise among Jordanian University Students

Time : 11:50-12:10

Speaker
Biography:

Khaldoun Hamdan is assistant professor at the faculty of nursing Al-Ahliyya Amman University. He is assistant dean for clinical affairs

Abstract:

Introduction: Insufficient physical activity is a risk factor for many non communicable diseases. Perceived benefits and barriers to exercise are important factors that affect individuals’ engagement in physical activity. The purpose of this study was to examine Jordanian university students perceived benefits and barriers to exercise.

Material and Methods: This cross-sectional descriptive study used Exercise Benefits/Barriers Scale to examine perceived benefits and barriers of exercise in a convenience sample (N = 525) of university students in Jordan.

Results: The mean age of the students was 20.7 ± 2.4 years and 71.8% of the students were female. Participants reported significantly higher perceived barriers to exercise than perceived benefits from exercise (t (523) = 27.9, p < 0.001). I am too embarrassed to exercise was the most important perceived barrier to exercise. I will live longer if I exercise and exercising increases my acceptance by others were the most important perceived benefits from exercise.

Conclusion:Physical activity and promotion programmes designed for university students should assist them to overcome any perceived barriers, and to further highlight the multiple health and other benefits of regular exercising.

Speaker
Biography:

Altuntas  has completed his PhD at the age of 25 years from Dicle  University School of Medicine. In 2007 he received family physician expertise from the Harran University School of Medicine. He has taken an active role in the project of "Effectiveness of chlorokine in malaria and malaria epidemiology".

Abstract:

Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the relation between the body composition characteristics and metabolic parameters in patients with PCOS those known to have increased metabolic risks and having no study done before about body fat ratios and other body compositions with “Bioelectrical Impedance Analysis” (BIA).

Material and Method: 23 non-obese PCOS patients (BMI≤27 kg/m²) and 20 matched healthy controls (BMI≤25 kg/m²) were involved to this prospective study. Antropometric parameters, metabolic parameters, 75 gr OGTT and Ferriman-Galwey score were investigated at 3rd and 8th day of the menstrual cycle. Insulin resistance was calculated. Body compositions (fat mass, body fat ratio(BFR),Lean Body Mass(LBM) and Total Body Water(TBW) and basal metabolic rate(BMR) were measured by BIA.

Signs: Lutenizan hormone(LH), total testesterone(Tt),free testesterone(fT) and Dehydroepiandrosterone Sulphate (DHEAS) levels were found to be significanlty high and Sex Hormone Binding Globulin levels were found to be significantly low.(p<0.05). A negative relation between insulin sensitivity index and tT, sT, TBW and BMR was found. There was a positive significant correlation between AUC insulin and sT. There was a strong negative correlation found between area under the curve AUC insulin and SHBG. There was a negative significant relation between BFR and tT. A strong negative relation was present sT and DHEAS. There was a positive significant relation present between LBM and tT, sT and DHEAS. A positive significant correlation was present between  BFR and BMI. There was a negative significant relation found between LBM and BMI.

Results: We found significant correlations between body compositions and metabolic parameters with BIA method in our hypothesis. This makes the use of BIA in PCOS patients suitable. On the other hand, for a better comprehesion of the relation between the body composition characteristics and metabolic parameters with BIA, we need long term studies with high number of patients.

Mustafa Afifi

Ras al-Khaimah Medical and Health Sciences University, UAE

Title: Child abuse: The cycle of violence

Time : 12:30-12:50

Speaker
Biography:

Mustafa Afifi held his Medical Bachelor, Master of Internal Medicine and three Post-graduate Diplomas in Mental Health, Primary Health Care and General Administration. Then, he terminated his Doctorate in Public Health followed by another Master’s in Health Professional Education. He had his Postdoctoral training in the American University Beirut. He worked in many countries, of them is the UAE. In the UAE, he worked as a Consultant of Mental Health for the Ministry of Health (Head Quarter) for six years, where he integrated mental health services in primary health care. Then, he got his post as Assistant Professor in RAK Medical & Health Sciences University. He has over 80 PubMed publications in non-communicable diseases, mental health, gender issues and health professional education. He is also a Member of many Editorials or Referee Boards of many PubMed indexed medical journals.

Abstract:

Child abuse is a public health problem worldwide. Even witnessing domestic violence is a sort of violence against the child. Our aim was to help the Public Health Center (PHC) doctors to understand the cycle of violence in child abuse. A PubMed based mini review was conducted based on papers published in the last 10 years. Almost a decade ago, logistic regression models showed that exposure to marital violence increased nearly two times the odds (OR=1.89) of hitting or slapping the child on the body and/or the face to address his behavior problems. Another study proved the associations of unhealthy beliefs about female genital cutting with maternal physical abuse. That means a victim of violence would be a future victimizer. Similarly, more recent studies proved that child maltreatment leads to aggressive social behavior adopted by the children and adolescents later on in their lives. Violence against women usually starts even before the girl is born and extends all over life cycle. Mothers with personality disorders are less able to resolve their experience of abuse. The lower sensitivity and higher hostility of those mothers could be transmitted again to their offspring being adolescents. Regardless of the way or process, parenting programs could have a positive effect on risk factors of child maltreatment. Higher-quality child rearing environments and experience of positive changes among the participants of some of these programs are noticed along with individual change with its probable implications on child maltreatment prevention. Yet, evaluation of these parenting programs yields unsatisfactory results. To conclude; besides the need to evaluate the current parenting programs and assess its impact on child maltreatment prevention, participation in it needs to be normalized and seen as a routine part of the child-rearing process.

Biography:

Caroline Funmbi Akinnubi is an expert in health education. Her research works has extremely contributed towards the application of preventive measures in health education. She has researched to the issues in the areas of sexuality and reproductive health education, environmental health education, drug education, physical fitness education, physical exercises education, health promotion education, community health education, nutrition  education and family life education. Her expertise in assessment and passion in improving the healthy living and wellbeing of people, through preventive measures has created various ways in educating and enlightening individuals by improving primary healthcare services. She has built this model after years of experience in research, evaluation, teaching and administration particularly in educational institutions. 

Abstract:

Health protection is really very important in our daily living. The health of individual, family and the community are of paramount importance to the global world, which should be taking care of extensively. This consists of series of activities done by individual to enhance a healthy living and healthy appearance/ outlook. Such activities are, personal cleanliness, eating of balanced diet, prevention of communicable diseases, safety and freedom from accident, healthy and clean environment, engaging in recreational activities, then rest and sleep. When these are done often, then one is promoting one’s health. Health promotion is putting into practice good health behavioural patterns that can fetch one a healthy living. Based on the aforementioned issues, it is recommended that awareness on the need to protect and promote one’s health and the health dangers involved should be created by educating the masses through mass media and enlightenment campaign through organized seminars and conferences on health by the government and non-governmental agencies. The World health organization (WHO) should also be involved.

Biography:

Ahmed Al-Mandhari is a Graduate from College of Medicine & Health Sciences at Sultan Qaboos University, Oman in 1993. He is the holder of DTM&H and PhD from University of Liverpool in 1996 and 2002 and MRCGP (International) in 1998. He worked as Head of Quality Management Department in 2005-2006 and then as Deputy Director General for Clinical Affairs, from 2006-2010. He also served as Director General of Sultan Qaboos University Hospital (SQUH) from 2010-2013. Currently, he is the Director General of the Quality Assurance Center at the Ministry of Health. He runs one day/week clinic as Senior Consultant Family Physician at SQUH. He had 3 WHO-EMRO funded projects carried out for the Ministry of Health (Oman). He is the Member of Editorial Board and reviewer for some journals and universities websites such as McMaster Online Rating for Evidence (MORE), Canada. He has published several articles on health care quality and health care seeking behavior. He is running workshops such as “how to conduct successful clinical audit” and “disclosure of medical errors”. 

Abstract:

Healthcare systems are striving towards improving quality of health care services and secure patient’s safety. Various tools have been implemented, however, the success of these tools depends on how valued and reliable measure these tools are using. Therefore, it has been expressed by many accrediting and certifying systems that healthcare institutions must create a monitoring system that is relying on evidence-based indicators. The healthcare system in Oman is no exception from such track. Ministry of Health worked on developing a list of indicators that are used to assess the level of quality and patients’ safety. These were developed following a systematic and scientific manner. The paper will share this experience and the impact of such exercise on outcome of care.

Speaker
Biography:

Farah Muhammad A. Mansuri is a public health physician. She has been working actively in the field of epidemiology for over 25 years.  She has contributed not only in public health research but also has showed her deep interest in medical education. The research presented here highlights the importance of inter-professional education in primary care setting by experiencing course of research methodology to a variety of primary health care providers. 

Abstract:

Objectives: Public Health research demands a participatory approach while working with communities to combat expected challenges in the field. Therefore a  training program on research methodology was introduced at Karachi Medical and Dental College, focusing on the principles of IPE, in order to improve primary care services. The objectives of this study were to assess level of learning by the participants in domain of communication and to explore participants’ opinion regarding evaluation of training program.

Methods: Total 96 participants of the research methodology course were selected during March and September 2010. It included faculty members, medical students, social works students and health technicians. The results were obtained through reflection of students and faculty, responded the first time the course was offered. It was a mixed method research where communication competencies of research course and participants’ perception on course evaluation were analyzed and findings were triangulated. 

Results: It was noted that 87% of faculty enjoyed contributing to ‘inter-professional relationship’; ‘team work’ in community focused areas was learnt to greater extent by 90% of students. 78% of students and 70% of faculty identified ‘active listening’ and ‘communicating information to families’ respectively as been learnt to lesser extent. These findings were defended by their deliberations on course evaluation.

Conclusion: The learning was found to be maximal on contribution at inter-professional relationship among faculty as compared to team work  best learnt by students. Moreover, it was evident that though active listening was learnt lesser but information was better communicated to families by students than faculty.

Neeraj Bedi

Gandhi Medical College, India

Title: E-health and primary health care
Biography:

Neeraj Bedi is a dedicated and experienced Medical professional with a teaching, training, research and administrative experience of 26 years in the Public Health domain in the field of epidemiology, preventive medicine, community medicine, hospital administration and management. Presently, he is working as Senior Faculty in Community Medicine, Medical College, Bhopal. He is having many research articles published in national and international journals. 

Abstract:

The role of health informatics is becoming significantly crucial in every part of the health sector. Rapid advancement in information technology has made it mandatory as well desirable to use e-Health in patients care and in public health. The main issues in providing patients care arise from incomplete information, exchanging the information, duplicating investigations and monitoring the response to treatment. Accordingly WHO has set goals of comprehensive patients’ information including investigations; treatment accessible at all places by health care providers irrespective of the location, to be achieved by 2012. The use of ICT in the form e-Health technology in health care sector can help achieving this target. The e-Health components includes Electronic Medical Records (EHR), Electronic Health Records (HER), Electronic Personal Health Records (PHR), Tele health, telemedicine, m-health i.e. use of mobile smart i-phone apps for health purposes and e-learning. The e-Health improves the efficiency, equity, the quality of health care, empower consumers and patients, encourages bonding, educates , enabling the information exchange and take care of Ethical issues in health care. The impact of e-Health on stakeholders enables them to have health care available at home, at work or in school. It focuses on prevention, education and self-management, availability of complete information and improves patients’ safety. Medical researchers and Policy makers i.e. Government too derive benefits by e-Health. At International level Australia, Canada, USA and most European countries have adapted the use of e-Health in health care. In India too the beginning has been made by corporate group of hospitals /private hospitals and Government has also initiated e-Health plan but still a long journey ahead to implement e-health in entire country.

Biography:

Mininim Oseji became a Consultant Public Health and Community Physician at the age of 34 years after being awarded the Fellowship of the National Postgraduate Medical College of Nigeria (Public Health). She also is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene and the West African College of Physicians (Community Health). 
She is currently the Permanent Secretary of the Delta State Primary Health Care Development Agency as well as the Executive Director of Public Health Impact Research Centre. She has made 29 scientific presentations at national and international conferences and has 8 published original articles.

Abstract:

Introduction: Quality primary health care services are required for achieving universal health coverage in Nigeria. Universal health coverage will not only improve health indicators but also reduce poverty and inequity. In 2015, a new administration took over the helm of affairs in Delta state of Nigeria. A retreat was organized for policy makers and one of the outcomes was the development of key performance indicators for each sector including health.

Methodology: The Delta state Primary Health Care Development Agency began tracking key performance indicators for monitoring primary health care services in Delta state in 2016. Ten indicators were identified and tracked monthly. They include: Immunization coverage; Number of supplemental immunization activities organized; Number of social mobilization activities organized; Number of information, communication materials distributed; Number of cases of severe acute malnutrition identified and rehabilitated; Percentage of children under five that received vitamin A; Number of treatment protocols developed and enforced; Number of PHC workers trained on immunization, health education/social mobilization, basic life support, neonatal resuscitation training and data management; Number of public private partnerships established and; Number of public private partnership projects completed.

Results: Immunization coverage as at August 2016 for BCG was 94% while that of measles was 96%. Tetanus toxoid coverage was 37%. Six cases of severe acute malnutrition were identified and the percentage of children under five that received vitamin A was 92%. Four public private partnerships were established with three projects completed.

Discussion: The key performance indicators currently being tracked do not require funding. Other key performance indicators that require funding for tracking include number of patients attending health facilities for antenatal care, deliveries and child welfare; number of households experiencing maternal deaths and immunization defaulting visited; income generated from sale of essential drugs. When policy decisions are based on the key performance indicators, the quality of primary health care services being rendered improves and the hope for achieving universal health coverage is in sight.

Speaker
Biography:

Batool Pouraboli has completed her PhD and is an expert in qualitative and quantitative research in adults and paediatric and neonatal nursing. Currently, she is a Faculty in Tehran Nursing University, Iran.

Abstract:

Type II diabetes is one of the most prevalent chronic diseases that reduce happiness. Group hope therapy can be used to increase happiness of such patients. The present research aims to determine effectiveness of group hope therapy on happiness of patients with type II diabetes who referred to a diabetic clinic at southeast of Iran. This is a quasi-experimental study. Statistical population is all patients with type II diabetes who referred to a diabetic clinic at southeast of Iran. Among them, 40 individuals were selected based on inclusion criteria and they were placed in intervention and control groups using random numbers’ table. Intervention group received group hope therapy within 8 sessions. Oxford happiness questionnaire was used. Data were analysed using descriptive and inferential statistics such as independent t and paired t tests. Happiness was significantly increased in intervention group after group hope therapy (P<0.001). Moreover, mean happiness in control group was increased after group hope therapy but it was not significant (P=0.22). Results showed that group hope therapy improved happiness of diabetic patients and it can be used by healthcare team.

Biography:

Alok K Mathur has professional background of research, evaluation, program management and documentation in various innovative projects. He has done his PhD in Commerce, Master’s in EAFM, MBA in HRD and Bachelor’s in Journalism and Mass Communication. He has many international and national publications to his credit. He has developed and managed HIV prevention, care and support demonstration project “Saksham” addressing rural traditional female sex workers with the approach of empowerment. He has the credit of initiating first two sex workers collectively through ICHAP and first block level ‘Prevention of parent to child transmission centre’ through UNICEF in Rajasthan.

Abstract:

The present study was accomplished to examine the level of stress, anxiety and depression faced by the adolescents who were taking coaching for pre-medical and pre-engineering exams in Kota. The broad objective of the study was to assess the level of depression, anxiety and stress among students preparing for competitive exams like IIT, CPMT, RPMT, AFMC, AIEEE, RPET etc. and also to find out the difference in the level of sBackground: The present study was accomplished to examine the level of stress, anxiety and depression faced by the adolescents who were taking coaching for pre-medical and pre-engineering exams in Kota.

Objective: The broad objective of the study was to assess the level of depression, anxiety and stress among students preparing for competitive exams like IIT, CPMT, RPMT, AFMC, AIEEE, RPET etc. and also to find out the difference in the level of stress, anxiety and depression between those who are preparing for engineering and medical entrance exams.

Methods: The total population from 8 sample coaching institutes is 800 adolescents of which 400 students were from pre-medical and 400 were from pre-engineering coaching institutions of Kota city. The tool used to measure three negative emotional states was DASS (Depression, anxiety and stress scale). The anxiety level of adolescents was measured on four constructs: autonomic arousal, skeletal muscle effect, situational anxiety and subjective experience of anxious effect.

Results: The major findings suggested that nearly about one third of adolescents of the sample reported moderate level of anxiety, which was followed by normal, severe, extremely severe and mild level of anxiety. A substantially large number of students (approximately 30 percent) were found to be depressed at moderate level. The girls were found to be more depressed and having the feeling of hopelessness, sadness, decreased level of enthusiasm, anhedonia, inertia, etc.

Conclusion: The final analysis of stress, anxiety and depression reveals that extremely severe cases were found more in Medical students than in Engineering students.stress, anxiety and depression between those who are preparing for engineering and medical entrance exams. The total population of the 8 sample coaching institutes is 800 adolescents of which 400 students were from pre-medical and 400 were from pre-engineering coaching institutions of Kota city. The tool used to measure three negative emotional states was DASS (Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale). The anxiety level of adolescents was measured on four constructs: autonomic arousal, skeletal muscle effect, situational anxiety, and subjective experience of anxious effect. The major findings suggested that near about one third of adolescents of the sample reported moderate level of anxiety, which was followed by normal, severe, extremely severe and mild level of anxiety. A substantially large number of students (approximately 30 percent) were found to be depressed at moderate level. The girls were found to be more depressed and having the feeling of hopelessness, sadness, decreased level of enthusiasm, Anhedonia, Inertia, etc. The final analysis of Stress, Anxiety and Depression reveals that extremely severe cases were found more in medical than Engineering.

Biography:

Harsha has his expertise on reproductive and health issues in developing country context. His open and contextual evaluation of reproductive health issues in emergency context help several of the organization to design the intervention in Nepalese context.  He has an enthusiasm to build the capacity of the students, social work and identification of gaps in health service delivery.

Abstract:

Background: Comprehensive studies of family planning (FP) in displaced camps are relatively uncommon. This paper examines family planning knowledge, attitudes, and practices among in earth quake displaced population of Sindupalchok district of Nepal.
Objective: To assess knowledge, attitude and practice of family planning and affecting factors for used of FP 
Methodology: From January to March 2016 a cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted of 566 married women of age (15-49) years. Multi-stage sampling technique was used and data were collected for socio-demographics, practice of FP methods, knowledge, and attitude. Statistics were calculated for selected indicators.
Results: The mean age of participants was 31.55 years. About 65.3 % of women reported using any method of family planning in the past, compared with 85.5 %of women reporting current usage of family planning methods. Recognition of at least one family planning method was nearly universal i.e.97.61%. Age, education status and age at marriage were significantly associated (p< 0.05) with contraceptive usage. It was observed that participants who were at the age group of 15-24 years had positive attitude by 2 and 11 time more than participants of age of 25-34 years and above 35 years respectively.
Conclusions:
Our results demonstrate that respondents have a high knowledge and a positive attitude towards, family planning methods. Spousal discussion can be a crucial step towards increasing men’s participation in family planning issues. Distance to health facility play major role in utilization of FP methods.
 

Nehal Shata

McGill University in Montreal, Canada

Title: An Overview of Child Abuse in Saudi Arabia
Speaker
Biography:

Nehal Shata MD, MPH began her career in Public Health as a paediatrics teaching assistant at king -Abdulaziz University Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. She obtained her Masters of Public Health at the Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health. Her capstone project on child abuse outlined an overview of the situation in Saudi Arabia. After completing her degree, she did a year at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine as a postdoctoral research fellow investigating how sleep disturbance during critical illness modulates outcomes in children. She is currently a Pediatric resident at McGill University in Montreal, Canada, where she will continue her work as a child advocate in Public Health.

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem:In Saudi Arabia, child abuse still having underreporting problem, and remains a common problem in the country. Professionals and public servants of all child-focused fields must combat this problem through the implementation of an awareness program to increase reporting and easy detection of abuse.

Methodology & Theoretical Orientation: The search engines used for this review were: PubMed databases, PsycINFO, and Google Scholar. The research limited results to within Saudi Arabia and utilized the following keywords: maltreatment, Child Protective Services, reporting child abuse, child abuse types.

Findings & Conclusion: Child abuse is a public health concern globally, as well as within Saudi Arabia. A reporting system to indicate its prevalence was introduced to Saudi Arabia in 2010, and served as the first annual registry report for the region. Since that time, through the efforts of the National Family Safety Program, the reporting data has improved. According to current literature, physical abuse and neglect are currently the most common types of abuse, followed by sexual and emotional abuse. Parents are the most common perpetrators. The most common risk factors include: large family size of more than six people, paternal unemployment, and/or divorced parents. Although child protection teams now exist and notify the social protection department, police, and regional principals, under-recognition and under-reporting continue to pose major challenges.

Recommendations: The recommendations put forth at the conclusion of this review are as follows: first, that public child abuse prevention programs be implemented which apply to all thirteen regions of Saudi Arabia, including rural areas. Secondly, those health care providers receive training to recognize and report child abuse through implementation and follow-through on guidelines, workshops, and mandatory training programs. Additionally, to implement a large-scale parenting education program for parents, as they are the most common perpetrators. Implementation of school curriculum which teaches children how to protect themselves from abuse will also be vital. Finally, to conduct and evaluate the effectiveness of these preventive programs regularly, with emphasis on sustainability and regular follow ups as key elements of a successful program.